The effect of hypohydration on strength, power and reactive strength index in strength trained males.

Anderson, Robert (2013) The effect of hypohydration on strength, power and reactive strength index in strength trained males. Masters thesis, St Mary's University.

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Abstract

Many combat sports such as wrestling, boxing, judo and mixed martial arts require athletes to meet certain weight classes in order to compete. In order to gain a potential competitive advantage over opponents, many athletes competing in combat sports undergo regimens of rapid weight loss in an effort to dramatically reduce their bodyweight. These methods may include fluid manipulation via fluid restriction, as well as use of heat exposure often combined with exercise (Judelson, Maresh, Farrell, et al., 2007). The use of these fluid manipulation practices may result in athletes competing in a state of hypohydration. The negative effects of hypohydration on endurance performance such as decreasing cardiovascular and thermoregulatory function, as well as limiting endurance capacity are well documented (Ekblom et al., 1970; Murray, 1992; Murray, 1995). Whilst the detrimental effects of hypohydration on endurance sport have been ascertained, the effect on measures of strength and power remains uncertain. Therefore, it is possible fluid manipulation inducing hypohydration may result in a negative effect on combat sport performance due to reductions in strength and power, as these are considered basic components of physical performance (Jones, Cleary, Lopez, Zuri, & Lopez, 2008). The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of hypohydration on measures of strength and power in combat sport athletes. It is hypothesised that hypohydration will significantly reduce strength and power

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Additional Information: MSc Applied Sport and Exercise Physiology. Please email irc-team@smuc.ac.uk for a copy of this dissertation.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Combat sports; Fluid manipulation
Subjects: 600 Technology > 612 Human physiology
700 The arts; fine & decorative arts; recreation > 796 Athletic & outdoor sports & games
School/Department: School of Sport, Health and Applied Science
Depositing User: Catherine O'Sullivan
Date Deposited: 11 Mar 2014 15:47
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2014 15:47
URI: http://research.stmarys.ac.uk/id/eprint/681

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