Understanding the effect of touchdown distance and ankle joint kinematics on sprint acceleration performance through computer simulation

Bezodis, Neil E. and Trewartha, Grant and Salo, Aki I. T. (2015) Understanding the effect of touchdown distance and ankle joint kinematics on sprint acceleration performance through computer simulation. Sports Biomechanics. ISSN 1476-3141 (In Press)

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Abstract

This study determined the effects of simulated technique manipulations on early acceleration performance. A planar seven-segment angle-driven model was developed and quantitatively evaluated based on the agreement of its output to empirical data from an international-level male sprinter (100 m personal best = 10.28 s). The model was then applied to independently assess the effects of manipulating touchdown distance (horizontal distance between the foot and centre of mass) and range of ankle joint dorsiflexion during early stance on horizontal external power production during stance. The model matched the empirical data with a mean difference of 5.2%. When the foot was placed progressively further forward at touchdown, horizontal power production continually reduced. When the foot was placed further back, power production initially increased (a peak increase of 0.7% occurred at 0.02 m further back) but decreased as the foot continued to touchdown further back. When the range of dorsiflexion during early stance was reduced, exponential increases in performance were observed. Increasing negative touchdown distance directs the ground reaction force more horizontally; however, a limit to the associated performance benefit exists. Reducing dorsiflexion, which required achievable increases in the peak ankle plantar flexor moment, appears potentially beneficial for improving early acceleration performance.

Item Type: Journal Article
Subjects: 600 Technology > 612 Human physiology
700 The arts; fine & decorative arts; recreation > 796 Athletic & outdoor sports & games
School/Department: School of Sport, Health and Applied Science
Depositing User: Neil Bezodis
Date Deposited: 13 May 2015 10:34
Last Modified: 13 May 2015 10:34
URI: http://research.stmarys.ac.uk/id/eprint/888

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