Subjective monitoring tools can be used to predict objective markers of readiness to train and perform in professional rugby union players

Fletcher, Joshua D. (2015) Subjective monitoring tools can be used to predict objective markers of readiness to train and perform in professional rugby union players. Masters thesis, St Mary's University.

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether subjective measures, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and wellness questionnaires could be used to predict objective markers of readiness to train and play, countermovement jump (CMJ), drop jump reactive strength index (DJ-RSI) and maximal voluntary isometric handgrip in professional rugby union players throughout the English rugby championship season. Thirty four elite rugby union players volunteered to take part in this study (age 23.3 ± 5.7 years, height 1.89 ± 0.50m, mass 101.3 ± 19.2 kg). CMJ height, DJ-RSI, handgrip, wellness and rugby session RPE were collected over the course of the season. Significant correlations were found between CMJ and wellness (p = . .00, r2 = .23), CMJ and RPE (p = .02, r2 = -.18), DJ-RSI and wellness (p = .00, r2 = .34). No correlations were found between DJ-RSI and RPE (p = .48, r2 = .05), RPE and handgrip (p = .60, r2 = .40) and wellness and handgrip (p = .65, r2 = .03). Whilst RPE was found to be able to predict CMJ and wellness could predict CMJ and DJ-RSI, the strength of the correlations were too weak to be able to say this with any confidence that subjective measures can predict objective measures.. Whilst subjective performance markers wellness and RPE may be able to predict readiness to train in professional rugby union players, it is recommended that they are used in conjunction with specific CMJ variables, flight time: contraction time and peak power. Furthermore there is no evidence to suggest that handgrip can be used as a valid measure of readiness to train and perform.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Additional Information: MSc Strength and Conditioning
Subjects: 600 Technology > 612 Human physiology
700 The arts; fine & decorative arts; recreation > 796 Athletic & outdoor sports & games
School/Department: School of Sport, Health and Applied Science
Depositing User: Jonathan Lucas
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2016 11:54
Last Modified: 01 Feb 2016 11:54
URI: http://research.stmarys.ac.uk/id/eprint/955

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