Similar head impact acceleration measured using instrumented ear patches in a junior rugby union team during matches in comparison with other sports

King, Doug A. and Hume, Patria A. and Gissane, Conor and Clark, Trevor N. (2016) Similar head impact acceleration measured using instrumented ear patches in a junior rugby union team during matches in comparison with other sports. Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics. pp. 1-8. ISSN 1933-0707

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2015.12.PEDS15605

Abstract

Objective: Direct impact with the head and the inertial loading of the head have been postulated as major mechanisms of head-related injuries, such as concussion. Methods: This descriptive observational study was conducted to quantify the head impact acceleration characteristics in under-9-year-old junior rugby union players in New Zealand. The impact magnitude, frequency, and location were collected with a wireless head impact sensor that was worn by 14 junior rugby players who participated in 4 matches. Results: A total of 721 impacts > 10g were recorded. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of impacts per player was 46 (IQR 37–58), resulting in 10 (IQR 4–18) impacts to the head per player per match. The median impact magnitudes recorded were 15g (IQR 12g–21g) for linear acceleration and 2296 rad/sec2 (IQR 1352–4152 rad/sec2) for rotational acceleration. Conclusions: There were 121 impacts (16.8%) above the rotational injury risk limit and 1 (0.1%) impact above the linear injury risk limit. The acceleration magnitude and number of head impacts in junior rugby union players were higher than those previously reported in similar age-group sports participants. The median linear acceleration for the under- 9-year-old rugby players were similar to 7- to 8-year-old American football players, but lower than 9- to 12-year-old youth American football players. The median rotational accelerations measured were higher than the median and 95th percentiles in youth, high school, and collegiate American football players.

Item Type: Journal Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: injury; linear; rotational; impact; rugby union; wireless head impact sensor
Subjects: 600 Technology > 610 Medicine & health
700 The arts; fine & decorative arts; recreation > 796 Athletic & outdoor sports & games
School/Department: School of Sport, Health and Applied Science
Depositing User: Kevin Sanders
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2016 11:19
Last Modified: 07 Mar 2016 11:19
URI: http://research.stmarys.ac.uk/id/eprint/992

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